Your Digital Life

Your Digital Footprint After Death

Our lives are increasingly becoming digital. Everything from where we receive our news to how we shop involves a username and password or an account. Below is a sample list of what the average person’s digital life might look like:

  • Email: Gmail, Hotmail, Yahoo, AOL…
  • Social: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Reddit, Snapchat…
  • Career: LinkedIn, Monster, About, Tumblr, WordPress…
  • Communication: Verizon, AT&T, Viber, Skype…
  • Media: Pandora, Spotify, iTunes, Dropbox, Google Drive, Netflix, Hulu …
  • Necessities: Amazon, Walgreens, eBay, Target, Online Grocers…
  • Bills: Utilities, Mortgage, Auto, Mint, Paypal…
  • Travel: Airline miles, Hotel bonus points, Hotels.com, Hotwire, Orbitz, Uber…
  • Dating Life: eHarmony, Plenty of Fish, Tinder…
  • Entertainment: Groupon, Grubhub, Stubhub, Ticketmaster…

My Life & Wishes - Social Media After Death

What happens to social media accounts and email accounts after death? Most of our family members are left to sort out the various terms and conditions (T&Cs) agreements of each separate account to either access the account or shut it down.

Why Do I Need a Digital Archive?

Passwords and usernames should not be included in a Will since that is a public document. Passing on passwords to family members is an option, but when is the right time and what if they access accounts while you are still alive? Security and privacy is a concern for many; however, sharing passwords with family members may not be enough. The T&Cs of most digital service providers currently prohibit family members from logging into an account that is not theirs.

What are My Digital Footprint Options?

  1. Wait for regulation to pass that will allow family members access to accounts. The Uniform Law Commission is working to standardize state laws.
  2. Use a technical solution like My Life and Wishes to keep this information in a safe, encrypted digital space, that gives family members permission to access this information when you pass.

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